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Viewing a Property

Things To Consider and Questions to Ask When Viewing A Property

 

When you go to view a property, take a pad of paper and a pen so that you can document the pros and cons of the unit. This way it will be easier to compare various units you have visited.

Is the location an area you feel comfortable living in? 

  • If you want crime statistics, you can visit the Canyon Police Department at 301 16th St, or for the City of Amarillo, check out their website www.amarillopolice.org
  • Visit www.wtamu.edu/commuter to get further information on safety.
  • Visit the unit during the day and also at night to see if there is a major difference in environment.
  • Talk to the current tenants and see what their experience has been as far as crime issues, safety issues, etc.
  • What floor is your apartment located on?
    • Living on the first floor can be convenient when moving. But living on the first floor may have noise from the units above you.
    • Units on upper floors can present problems when moving. But heating costs could potentially be lower if there are people living below you
    • Some feel safer living on the upper floors versus the bottom or first floor.

Is the size of the unit adequate for your needs?

  • Is the kitchen large enough for your cooking needs?
  • Are the bedrooms large enough for your furniture?
  • Are the closets adequate for your personal belongings?

Is there sufficient lighting in the unit for your comfort (at least one window in all bedrooms and the living area)?

Is everything in the unit in good working condition?

  • Does the heat work properly? Test the thermostat.
  • If you do not have access to the thermostat, is the landlord in charge of the heat? And if so, at what point does he/she turn the heat on? At what temperature is the building kept?
  • If there is air conditioning, does that work properly? Test the thermostat.
  • Do the hot and cold faucets throughout the unit function properly? Test all faucets in sinks and showers. Test the toilet to make sure it flushes properly.
  • Do all windows open and close properly? Test all windows throughout the unit. Are there storm windows, and if not, is this something you don't mind living without?
  • Do all the windows lock?  If not, it is required by the Texas Property Code that all windows have locks.
  • Are all locks and dead bolts in working condition? Test all locks throughout the unit.
  • Is there visual access to see outside the front door (peepholes, windows, etc.)?  If not, the Texas Property Code requires it.
  • Are all light fixtures in good working condition? (You can even ask the current tenants).
  • Do all electrical outlets works properly? (You can even ask the current tenants).
  • Are all phone jacks in good working condition? (You can even ask the current tenants).
  • Are all smoke detectors in working condition (test the smoke detectors to make sure).  Note: Texas law requires every apartment to have a smoke detector.

Is the unit itself in a condition you are willing to live in?

  • Does the condition of the carpet/floors meet your requirements? If it is in bad condition and the landlord promises to remedy the situation, make sure to have this put in writing. It is beneficial to HAVE ALL VERBAL AGREEMENTS PUT IN WRITING!!
  • Are the walls and ceilings in a condition you are happy with? If the landlord promises to repaint all the rooms, for example, make sure to have this put in writing. Again, it is beneficial to HAVE ALL VERBAL AGREEMENTS PUT IN WRITING!!

Is off-street parking available?

  • If there are parking spots, how many are allocated per apartment/house?
  • Is there a cost associated to parking in the off-street lot?

Would you feel comfortable renting from the landlord?

  • Talk to the current tenants to see what their experience has been with the landlord.

 

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