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Volume 6, Number 4

Volume 6 (2010), Number 4

Table of Contents

Article

Study abroad: An Added Dimension to Preservice Teacher Education Programs

Author

Genevieve Aglazor
Teaching & Research Assistant
College of Education, Purdue University

Abstract

The racial and ethnic composition of students in U.S. classrooms reflects recent demographic changes. These rapidly changing demographic shifts have led to calls for reform of teacher education programs to facilitate the development of preservice teachers who possess the cultural awareness and other competencies required to teach diverse student populations. To address this need, many colleges and universities have turned to study abroad programs as an added dimension of preservice teacher education programs. This paper uses the Honduras Study Abroad Program, developed by a large Midwestern university, to explore how intercultural experience develops cultural awareness, increases cultural sensitivity and widens world views in culturally disconnected and resistant students.

Article

Diversity: Overstated and Underprepared

Author

David S. Benders, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Educational Studies Unit
Union College

Abstract

The idea of diversity is to identify the differences in everyone. The perceptions of diversity in current practices have primarily been focused on cultural and gender difference in people. This is not to solely suggest that all other differences have been completely ignored but to infer that the level of attention to the other areas of diversity has been limited at best. In today's educational system, historical philosophical ideals continue to be used as foundations of education. The academic achievement results imply the lack of acceptance of the conceptual practice to accept diversity. We find there are academic achievement gap between groups. This literature analysis explores the issue that we overstate the need for diversity acceptance in education however; we are fundamentally under prepared to incorporate diversity in instruction.

Article

The Racial Inequalities of Our Educational System

Author

Jessica L. Collins
Clemson University

Abstract

Many educators can agree that there is a racial disparity within our school system that is perpetuated further by common school practices, including academic tracking and mislabeling of students. This paper seeks to answer the following questions: Why do racial inequalities exist in our educational system? What evidence indicates the existence of these inequalities? What can be done to ultimately cease the practices that perpetuate these racial disparities in our schools? A discussion of research studies that have been conducted offers answers to these questions. With further study of this longstanding issue, its effect on our minority student population and their low achievement, and alternatives to policies that sustain many racial inequities within our schools, the disparities may lessen and more of our students may reach success.

Article

Considering the Retention of Latina Students in Community-Based English Language Learner Programs through the Lens of Critical, Feminist, and Ethno-Feminist Pedagogies

Author

Charmaine Lowe, Ed.D.
Austin Peay State University

Abstract

Despite scholarship verifying educational and economic disparities between Latino immigrants and other ethno-racial groups in the United States most profoundly affect Latinas, there is a dearth of research concerning the academic experiences of Latina immigrants in alternative educational environments. This work is a qualitative study of the academic trajectories of three Latina immigrants enrolled in a community-based ELL program addressing how the retention and engagement of such learners students may best be fostered and sustained. The major findings address ELP's role as an equalizer in processes of intercultural mediation, the transcendence of traditional gender roles through ELP, and remedies for a sense of local exclusion.

Article

Writing Hip-Hop, Exhibiting Critical Literacies: The Songs of Black Female Youth

Author

Nadjwa E.L. Norton
Associate Professor, Literacy Program
CCNY, CUNY

Abstract

In this article, the author joins multicultural feminist critical theories with the voices of two Black females to extend understandings about the ways youth exhibit critical literacies in their Hip-Hop writing. The data arises from one-year narrative inquiry empirical study. I illustrate how these females use hip-hop writing to illustrate inequities around the intersections of race, class, and gender as well as sexualities. In order to accomplish this, I analyze two songs that demonstrate the youth's abilities to name multiple inequities, to imagine different possibilities, and to provide advice to intended audience members about ways to position one's self more equitably. This research provides implications for educators that ask them to expand their knowledge of hip-hop, reconsider ways to use Hip-Hop as an educational tool, and to transform the ways in which they construct youth as writers.


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