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PBJ: Politics, Bureaucracy and Justice Journal Volume 1, Issue 1

PB&J: Volume 1, Issue 1

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PB&J Volume 1, Issue 1

Article

A Gorged Appetite

Author: Jonathan P. Ellis, West Texas A&M University
 

Abstract: This study was completed at a time when ethanol was considered to be a comparable fuel source. Environmental awareness was at a high among American citizens and concern about oil imports and high gas prices overshadowed most other national concerns. There was a national debate about ethanol, the new fuel alternative. Many items presented in this study at the time were known to but a few, these same items are now more widely researched and understood. Still it is not the intent of the study to inform on a single fuel alternative but rather to demonstrate that any fuel alternative will have much deeper ramifications that most interested parties, advocates, and policy makers are more likely to acknowledge.

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Article

Women in Policing

Author: Danielle Flanagan, West Texas A&M University
 

Abstract: This article outlines the history of women in American law enforcement. The author interviewed female police officers who worked with city and county agencies in the Texas Panhandle. Qualitative interviews were conducted with two high-ranking female officers in Massachusetts and California. Results determine women in the profession have overcome many obstacles but have not achieved complete equality.

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Article

 

The Birth of Big Brother: Privacy Rights in a Post-9/11 World

Author: Jesse Jones, West Texas A&M University

Abstract: Western European and North American countries reinterpreted their privacy laws after the terrorist attacks on New York City and the Pentagon in 2001. The author compares the increased use of camera surveillance in the United Kingdom to the Patriot Act in the United States. The article focuses upon the debate between supporters and opponents of American counter-terrorism laws and policies over the past eight years.

 

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Article

 

The Impact of Domestic Violence on Society

Author: Colleen Peace, West Texas A&M University

Abstract: Domestic violence is broadly defined as a form of physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and economic abuse of another person. Regardless of one’s race, gender, or economic status, domestic violence between partners, parents, etc., the author hypothesizes that only through educational programs can one reduce the impact this social issue has on victims, their families, friends, co-workers and health care providers.

 

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Article

 

Treatment of Minorities in Texas Government Textbooks

Authors: Debra P. Avara, Amarillo College  &  John David Rausch Jr, West Texas A&M University

Abstract: The authors compare Texas Government textbooks publishes between two periods: 1971 to 1984 and 1996 to 2005 for their discussion about the contributions made by women and racial minorities to the state. Results show books published in the second time frame provide more details. Except for a detailed discussion about late Governor Ann Richards, these books focus provide a less-than-average coverage on either topic.

 

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Article

 

When a Popular Idea Meets Congress: The History of the Term Limit Debate in Congress

Author: John David Rausch Jr, West Texas A&M University

Abstract: This paper examines the history of the term limit debate in the United States from the days of the Articles of Confederation through the 1990s. The research finds that the realities of the legislative process provide infertile ground for enacting congressional term limits. Advocates of term limits serving in Congress have not had the resources to overcome the obstacles presented by the legislative process. The findings contradict the conventional wisdom that Congress responds quickly to popular ideas that sweep the nation.

 

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Article

 

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Woodbury County, Iowa’s Community-Panel Drug Court Program

Author: Dwight Vick, West Texas A&M University

Abstract: This paper is part of a larger, five-year follow-up study of drug court participants in and the recidivism rates of the Woodbury County Drug Court Program. Drug court programs are a response to cost-effective alternatives to the modern-day correctional program. These new courts combine substance abuse treatment with social services in the criminal justice system. Program evaluations show this new form of criminal justice effectively reduces alcohol- and drug-related crime and recidivism. The key is direct contact with a judge who oversees the client during early recovery, but this can be cost-prohibitive. The county wanted to establish such a program but judges could not allocate the required time for oversight. As a result, they created the first community-based drug court program whereby individual clients work more closely with local volunteers who are trained in addiction and the law. The results show graduation rates equal to or exceeding national averages. The paper has three goals. First it analyses the total cost of the drug court program and compares costs associated with traditional probation. A cross-comparative analysis is conducted of 2002 juvenile and adult drug court graduates and the traditional system. Each group was followed for 30 months post-release. An analysis of their overall costs to the community shows that drug court expenses may be "frontloaded" but the program saved money in the long-term.

 

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email: pbj@wtamu.edu
phone: 806-651-2471

 



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