West Texas A&M University

Buff Transit Tracker
CAEP Accreditation Standard 3
STANDARD 3: Candidate Quality, Recruitment and Selectivity
  1. Summary of preliminary findings

  1. Narrative summary of preliminary findings

(FFR, p. 13, paragraph 1)

The EPP didn’t reach the goal for either group for admission for the most recent data provided.

Response and Clarification:

As clarification, the annual recruitment report that was submitted in the SSR detailed efforts of the university in recruitment that included WTAMU’s goals for recruiting African American and Hispanic students. National data indicates that African American and Hispanic males have the lowest graduation rate among college graduates across the country.

In response, WTAMU has created a male mentoring program Men of Honor that not only targets African American and Hispanic males, but also all males enrolled at WT. The goal of Men of Honor is to increase the retention and persistence of male students one semester at a time. Students in the Men of Honor program will experience weekly peer mentoring, mentoring from business professionals, participation in an active study hall, leadership workshops and seminars, community service opportunities, participating in campus activities, and opportunities to mentor high school students. Men of Honor will host their fall Meet and Greet on September 7, 2016 at WTAMU. All male students in WT classes are encouraged to attend. The Men of Honor program will provide an opportunity to form a lasting support system that will help WT students persist each semester until graduation.

All EPP faculty play a large role in our recruitment efforts. Each program has developed and distributed brochures that highlight the EPP and encourage potential candidates to join our programs. As a recent example, Dr. Ashley Campbell has directed the Dr. Geneva Schaeffer STEM Presentation for Educators by Dr. Tricia Berry, UT Austin on September 29, 2016 as part of the WTAMU Distinguished Lecture Series. As our Science Methods specialist, Dr.

Campbell is also directing the design and construction of the new Dr. Geneva Schaeffer STEM Lab with a Grand Opening anticipated to be held in Fall 2017. Other faculty members including Dr. Betty Coneway and Dr. Beth Garcia are completing a research study on recruitment that will be presented at our state CSOTTE Fall Conference in San Marcos, Texas in late October 2016.

With Bilingual Education being the primary teacher shortage area in our service area (see the EPP’s response following), the EPP designated Dr. Elsa Diego-Medrano, a faculty member who teaches Reading, Early Childhood, and Bilingual Education to be our point faculty member for recruitment. She has been given release time in Fall 2016 in order to focus upon recruitment for the EPP. Dr. Diego-Medrano leads EPP recruitment efforts in a variety of ways that includes:

  • attending and presenting at conferences;
  • distributing recruitment brochures and information to local area schools;
  • working with District Migrant Coordinators;
  • collaborating with the Director of Migrant Services for Region 16 Education Service Center (Dr. Ray Barbosa);
  • building an even stronger partnership with the principal and teachers of Eastridge Elementary School of Amarillo ISD;
  • working with local teachers;
  • sponsoring Adelante and BESO student organizations; and
  • serving on important university and EPP committees including the Diversity Committee and the WTAMU Distinguished Lecture Series Committee.

In working with members of these committees, Dr. Diego-Medrano has provided numerous workshops for targeted candidate groups. Most recently, the WTAMU Distinguished Lecture Series hosted Mark L. Madrid presenting Dream Big, Don’t Stop!

In January 2016, for the Texas Association of Future Teacher Educators Conference in Houston, Texas, Dr. Diego-Medrano took two education ambassadors candidates while working in tandem with the WTAMU Admissions Office. They distributed recruitment forms for the conference and maintained a list of interested students. In December 2015, Dr. Diego- Medrano attended and worked with Dr. Lisa Ramirez and the Region 16 ESC Migrant Workshop. Since many of the attendees were district Migrant Specialists who were concerned with how to get their students to attend a college or university, Dr. Ramirez directed them to Dr. Diego-Medrano.

Dr. Diego-Medrano worked with the Migrant Coordinator from Hereford ISD and brought 27 migrant students to our campus for a specialized tour provided by the Admissions Office and Adelante candidates. Small groups were created to encourage more in depth discussions and to answer any questions the migrant students had about attending WTAMU. A Bilingual Advisor and Dr. Diego-Medrano led the discussions.

Working with the Admissions Office, the EPP sought funding to develop a video to present to parents and anyone interested in attending WTAMU who have Spanish speaking parents and/or families. The Amarillo Hispanic Chamber of Commerce agreed to place the video on their website as did the Admissions Office. Media Minds (located in the Business College) and a Spanish-speaking graduate candidate produced the video and directed our Adelante candidates to ensure the video met the qualifications to reach a Hispanic audience.

Additionally as a representative of the EPP, Dr. Diego-Medrano has presented at Migrant Parent Informational Meetings to area districts. The meetings and shared materials were all in Spanish. Parts of the video from Media Minds were shared at the meetings. Also, Adelante students and Dr. Diego-Medrano shared information in Spanish for parents and interested students attending Discover WT in February and April. The Social Justice Conference invited school personnel and the community to hear a Chicano Civil Rights Activist mentioned in many history books to attend in April 2016.

Dr. Diego-Medrano presented at the Step Up to Success Conference hosted by Los Barrios de Amarillo that ensures a pathway to college readiness for non-traditional students. Dr. Diego- Medrano, Dr. Crystal Hughes, and two education candidates were invited to speak at Cruising with Tascosa to freshmen students to provide a candidate’s perspective to prospective WT students.

In 2015 and 2016, Dr. Diego-Medrano attended the Top of Texas Career Expo and provided a tour for interested students and is currently working with the Director of Migrant Services at Region 16 ESC to provide additionally opportunities to visit with districts, migrant coordinators, and attend family nights in order to recruit for our college. These groups are also interested in having their Leadership Conference on the WTAMU campus next semester.

The Amarillo Area Foundation initiated the ACE Scholarship Program in 1994 in partnership with Amarillo ISD, Amarillo College, and West Texas A&M University. ACE began at Palo Duro High School in 1994 and Caprock High School in 2002. Three elementary schools in the Tascosa High School Cluster were added to the ACE program in 2009 that included Lee Bivins, Margaret Wills, and San Jacinto Elementary Schools. Fifth graders attending these three elementary schools will be eligible for scholarship funds if they go on to attend Tascosa High School and meet the ACE program requirements for grades, attendance, and behavior.

ACE provides access to higher education for students at these schools by providing numerous preparatory activities throughout each student’s school career. ACE guarantees payment for tuition, fees, and books for up to 130 semester hours at Amarillo College (AC) or West Texas A&M University (WTAMU). Students receive the greatest benefit if they take 45 hours of core courses first at AC and then continue their education at WTAMU. Students can choose to start at WTAMU, but ACE will pay only as much as the cost of taking 45 hours from AC.

ACE requires high school students to pledge annually to maintain at least an 85 grade point average, a 95% attendance record, and appropriate behavior while attending high school. [See Amarillo Area Foundation www.amarilloareafoundation.org].

Peer mentors visit area districts and ACE scholarship students from local high schools (Caprock, Palo Duro, and Tascosa High Schools) that may be interested in attending WTAMU upon graduation from high school. As a peer mentor, Dr. Diego-Medrano will contact ACE scholarship students who are interested in attending the Department of Education or EPP and provide mentoring services for students prior to their graduation and after their enrollment at WTAMU. The EPP plans to assist our ACE scholarship candidates that are currently enrolled at WT for success as first generation college students and to encourage retention.

Dr. Diego-Medrano continues to collaborate with the WTAMU Mentorship Program for surrounding school districts. Additionally, Dr. Diego-Medrano is a member of Los Barrios de Amarillo, Breakfast in the Barrio, and works closely with the Bilingual Coordinator for Amarillo ISD (Sylvia Hughes), the ACE Coordinators at three area high schools, and the Principal of Eastridge Elementary. These partnerships have established a common goal in education and retention and provide access to higher education via scholarships for area students. Representing our EPP and the Hispanic community, Dr. Diego-Medrano will visit each high school campus to speak to prospective students on Family Nights in Fall 2016, beginning first with Palo Duro High School that has large African American and Hispanic student populations.

The recruitment efforts of the EPP and our designee Dr. Diego-Medrano are designed to increase the enrollments of African American, Hispanic, Asian, and male candidates for our EPP as outlined in the Diversity, Monitoring, and Recruitment Plan of the EPP. For Fall 2016, Dr. Diego-Medrano has been granted release time in order to increase her recruitment activities for the EPP in meeting our goals.

As the second highest teacher shortage area, limited English proficient candidates or ESL/ELLs and how the EPP meets these candidates’ needs are previously demonstrated in the SSR Addendum and Addendum Exhibits on pages 57-59. Thank you.

Please see the EPP’s response in the SSR Addendum as follows. Thank you.

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE63) Diversity, Monitoring, and Recruitment Plan of the EPP].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE64) Faculty Recruitment Research Study (Dr. Coneway and Dr. Garcia)].

[See Admission Exhibit (AE67) Diversity of Candidates (Admission to Completion)].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE89) Admissions Recruitment Report Update].

(FFR, p. 13, paragraph 1)

The EPP did not provide evidence of the shortage areas within the school districts that they service.

Response:

The EPP reviews multiple data sources to determine teacher shortage areas within our service area that include the Texas Education Agency, the American Association for Employment in Education Educator Supply and Demand Report, EPP Advisory Council, Teacher Education Unit (TEU), and Dean and Superintendents meetings with our stakeholders.

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) reports on the TEA website the annual teacher shortage areas and loan forgiveness programs for the state of Texas that are approved by the United States Department of Education (TEA).

The USDE approved shortage areas in Texas for the 2015-2016 and 2014-2015 school years were:

  1. Bilingual/English as a Second Language
  2. Career and Technical Education
  3. Computer Science
  4. English as a Second Language
  5. Mathematics
  6. Science
  7. Special Education – Elementary and Secondary Levels

The USDE approved shortage areas in Texas for the 2013-2014 school year were:

  1. Bilingual/English as a Second Language
  2. Computer Science
  3. Languages Other Than English (Foreign Language)
  4. Mathematics
  5. Science
  6. Special Education

The approved shortage areas give administrators the ability to recruit and retain qualified teachers and to help reward teachers for their hard work using the loan forgiveness opportunities. School principals can certify that a teacher has met the minimum qualifications required for certain loan forgiveness programs. The federal, state, and public service loan forgiveness programs are available to teachers. All school personnel can take advantage of the public service program.

The Educator Supply and Demand Report for 2015-2016 from university and school district representatives reports the following shortage areas in our region: Bilingual Education/Multicultural; ESL/ELL (English Language Learner); Math; Chemistry;

Physics; and Special Education.

Through collaboration with our partners, our school districts report shortages in the areas of Bilingual; ESL/ELL; Math; Science; and Special Education.

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE50) Samples of Meeting Data].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE55) Dean and Superintendent Study Protocol Data].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE61) Texas Teacher Shortage Areas (TEA)].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE62) Educator Supply and Demand Reports].

(FFR, p. 13, paragraph 3)

The EPP plans to use the Candidate Evaluation Instruction (CEI) to evaluate candidates at five points during their collegiate program: admissions (EDPD 3341), during development, and three times during student teaching. The CEI has been piloted in two courses in one program (Reading) in the fall 2015 semester.

Response and Correction:

The CEI will be used at admissions in EPSY 3341, not “EDPD 3341”.

The CEI has also been used in all courses in all programs in a variety of ways as presented in the SSR Addendum.

  1. Evidence that is inconsistent with meeting the standard Response:

The EPP has previously responded to each of these prompts within the SSR Addendum. In response, Addendum Exhibits have been delineated for each prompt in brackets. Thank you.

(FFR, p. 14, middle of the page)

  1. Plans and goals that demonstrate recruitment of high-quality candidates from a broad range of backgrounds and diverse populations to accomplish their mission.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE63) and ( AE64)]. (FFR, p. 14, middle of page)
  2. Data from diversity from admission to completion.
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE67) Diversity of Candidates (Admission to Completion)].
    (FFR, p. 14, middle of page)
  3. Teacher shortage areas for districts that they service.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE50); ( AE55); ( AE61) and ( AE62)].
  4. Admission of Candidates for Academic Ability/Achievement (Dispositional) Evidence of the EPP (No data reported on diversity).
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE67); ( AE63); and ( AE64)].
  5. Impact on P-12 Learning not documented.

[See Addendum Exhibits (AE47); ( AE49); ( AE54); ( AE55); ( AE56); and ( AE57)].

List of onsite tasks to be completed. Use the following three prompts for each task.

Standard 3 Task 1

  1. Evidence in need of verification or corroboration

Response:

The EPP has previously responded to each of these prompts within the SSR Addendum. In response, Addendum Exhibits have been delineated for each prompt in brackets. Thank you.

(FFR, p. 14, bottom of page)

  1. Recruitment plan for diversity.
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE63) Diversity, Recruitment, and Monitoring Plan of the EPP].
  2. Meeting notes from stakeholder meetings to demonstrate EPP identified employment opportunities/needs in schools, districts, and/or regions.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE50); ( AE61); and ( AE62)].
  3. Candidate Portfolios/Monitoring System for Individual Students.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE63); ( AE45); and all candidate portfolios or Individual Candidate Folders are available for review in the Office of Teacher Preparation and Advising].
  4. Candidate data that took the TSI for admissions.
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE71) TSI for Admissions Data].
  5. Candidate data that took the SAT or ACT for 2016-2017 admission.
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE72) ACT and SAT Data for Admissions].
  6. Professional Development Appraisal System.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE17); ( AE22); and ( AE41)].
  7. Learning Assessment Reporting System (LARS) for candidate monitoring.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE73) and (AE74)].
  1. Excerpt from SSR to be clarified or confirmed

Response:

The EPP has previously responded to each of these prompts within the SSR Addendum. In response, Addendum Exhibits have been delineated for each prompt in brackets. Thank you.

(FFR, p. 14, bottom of page and p. 15, top of page)

  1. ‘Some of the representative goals and key activities to support the goals are as follows…’ To see the complete diversity action plan and Recruitment Monitoring Plan.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE63) and ( AE64)].

    (FFR, p. 15, top of page)
  2. Faculty trained on inter-rate reliability in the application of valid and reliable assessment rubrics so that the EPP may document and ensure that candidates have reached high standard] for content knowledge in the fields where certification is sought and can teach effectively with positive impacts on P-12 student learning and development through the EPP’s Decision Points.
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE39) and SSR Exhibit ( 1.1.16)].
  1. Questions for EPP concerning additional evidence, data, and/or interviews, including follow up on response to 1.c.

Response:

The EPP has previously responded to each of these prompts within the SSR Addendum. In response, Addendum Exhibits have been delineated for each prompt in brackets. Thank you.

(FFR, p. 15, middle of page)

  1. Who are all the stakeholders that influenced the Recruitment Plan?
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE63) Diversity, Recruitment, and Monitoring Plan of the EPP].
  2. Schools website can be translated in to Spanish, Hindi, and Arabic; does this reflect the changing demographics in the P-12 setting for the local area?
    Response of Correction and Clarification:
    The WTAMU website for the College of Education and Social Sciences can be translated into Spanish, Hindi, and Arabic. The website for the Department of Education contains English and Spanish.
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE68) West Texas A&M University Department of Education Website].
  3. What is the completion rate of candidates based upon the recruitment plan?
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE69) Completion Rate of Candidates].
  4. Preliminary data demonstrates that diverse student recruitment was not met. What steps is the EPP taking in order to meet the goals?
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE63); ( AE64); ( AE67); and ( AE70)].
  5. How is the EPP addressing the shortage in STEM and English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers?
    [See Addendum Exhibit (AE70) Addressing STEM and English as a Second Language (ESL) Teacher Shortages].
  6. How is the PDAS implemented and used?
    [See Addendum Exhibits (AE17); ( AE22); and ( AE41)].
  7. What are the demographics of accepted candidates?

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE67) Diversity of Candidates (Admission to Completion)].

3. Preliminary recommendations for new areas for improvement and/or stipulations including a rationale for each.

Areas for Improvement (AFIs)

(FFR, p. 15, bottom of page)

Area for Improvement: Candidate data is not disaggregated by race/ethnicity or gender from admission through completion.

Rationale: The EPP provided a Diversity Recruitment and Monitoring Plan. The EPP provides data that demonstrates that some of the goals were met in terms of recruitment. However, no candidate demographic data were provided from admission through completion.

Response:

The EPP provides evidence in the SSR Addendum and Addendum Exhibits (AEs) of the Diversity, Recruitment, and Monitoring Plan of the EPP (AE63) and candidate demographic data disaggregated by race/ethnicity and gender from admission through completion (AE67).

Candidate demographic data shows there were 314 undergraduates and 310 ACP applicants in 2012-2013. Of those undergraduate candidates who met EPP requirements,

308 were admitted, 207 retained, and 220 completed. There were 73 male and 235 female undergraduates admitted. Of the 310 ACP applicants, 278 were admitted, 273 retained, and 127 completed with 87 males and 191 females in the 2012/2013 academic year.

Of the undergraduate cohort in 2012-2013, there were four (4) African American, 66 Hispanic, 233 White, and 5 Other candidates admitted. Of the ACP cohort, there were 12 African American, 48 Hispanic, 215 White, and 3 Other candidates for a total of 220 completed.

The number of undergraduate finishers or completers in 2012-2013 was 47 males and 173 females with 3 African American, 46 Hispanic, 167 White, and 4 Other completers for a total of 220 completers. The ACP finishers or completers in 2012-2013 was 38 males and 89 females with 4 African American, 24 Hispanic, 96 White, and 3 Other for a total of 127 completed.

In the 2013-2014 undergraduate cohort, there were 80 applicants, 78 admitted, and 214 completed with 29 male and 51 female applicants. Of the 80 admitted after meeting EPP requirements, there were 3 African American, 18 Hispanic, 56 White, and 1 Other applicants. Of the ACP cohort, there were 180 applicants, 175 admitted, and 142 completed with 40 males and 140 females. Of those ACP candidates meeting the EPP requirements, there were 7 African American, 50 Hispanic, 122 White, and 1 Other admitted.

For undergraduate finishers or completers in 2013-2014, there were 53 male and 161 female candidates, 1 African American, 46 Hispanics, 162 White, and 5 Other for a total of 214 completers. Of the ACP completer cohort, there were 53 males and 161 females, 6 African American, 26 Hispanic, 107 White, and 3 Other completers for a total of 142 completers.

The number of undergraduate finishers or completers in 2013-2014, 53 males, 161 females, 1 African American, 46 Hispanic, 162 White, and 5 Other completers. The ACP finishers or completers 41 males, 101 females, 6 African American, 26 Hispanic, 107 White, and 3 Other candidates were ACP completers.

For undergraduates in 2014-2015, there were 161 applied, 157 admitted, 51 retained, and 165

completers with 31 males and 130 females, 0 African American, 47 Hispanic, 112 White, and 2 Other candidates were admitted. Of the ACP cohort, 267 applied, 145 admitted, 37 retained, and 156 completed. Of those ACP meeting EPP requirements, 38 males, 107 females, 4 African American, 33 Hispanic, 106 White, and 2 Other ACP candidates were admitted.

The number of undergraduate finishers or completers in 2014-2015, 48 males, 137 females, 3 African American, 37 Hispanic, 143 White, and 2 Other completers. Of the ACP cohort, 32 males, 124 females, 3 African American, 32 Hispanic, 119 White, and 2 Other candidates were ACP completers.

The EPP has also provided the Diversity, Monitoring, and Recruitment Plan of the EPP in Addendum Exhibit (AE63) and additional evidence in Addendum Exhibits (AEs).

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE63) Diversity, Monitoring, and Recruitment Plan of the EPP].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE64) Faculty Recruitment Research Study (Dr. Coneway and Dr. Garcia)].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE67) Diversity of Candidates (Admission to Completion)].

(FFR, p. 15, bottom of page)

Area for Improvement: EPP fails to document cohort average on CAEP criteria and/or state alternative.

Rationale: The EPP provided GPA’s for admissions into the EPP. However, it does not provide evidence that the group average performance on nationally normed ability/achievement assessments such as ACT, SAT, or GRE or an alternative is in the top 50 percent.

Response:

In the SSR Addendum and Addendum Exhibits (AEs), the EPP documents cohort averages on CAEP criteria and/or state alternatives. The WTAMU group average performance on nationally normed ability/achievement assessments including the ACT and SAT are in the top 50 percent for Fall 2013, Fall 2014, and Fall 2015.

For admission to WTAMU, applying freshmen must meet expectations for ACT and/or SAT scores for acceptance into the university. Cohort averages on the ACT and/or SAT as nationally normed tests represent scores of the 50% percentile or higher at admission.

Based upon admission data, the first-time, full-time, degree seeking freshman cohort data for Fall 2013 showed 950 freshman had an average of 21.19 on the ACT and 603 freshmen averaged 965.32 on the SAT. In Fall 2014, 958 freshmen averaged 20.78 on the ACT and 614 averaged 970.90 on the SAT. In Fall 2015, 1019 freshmen averaged 20.71 on the ACT and 683 averaged 967.07 on the SAT.

A score of 967 on the 1040 SAT exam is considered an average score. The average score on the 1600 SAT exam is 740 and 810 is considered above average. Cohort averages of 21 on the ACT and 967 on the SAT represent scores above the 50% percentile for all WT test takers on these nationally normed tests that meet CAEP requirements. Texas Student Success Initiative (SSI) data is limited, but will be available along with ACT and SAT data onsite.

At admission to the EPP, the Grade Point Averages (GPAs) of candidates following their core course work are evidence of candidate competencies in their selected areas of study (i.e., English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, etc.). For example, candidates are competent in their chosen core areas because they have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher when they are accepted into the program, which exceeds the state requirement of 2.50. The mean of each cohort from 2013 to 2015 meets or exceeds the CAEP GPA requirement of

3.0 GPA.

Additional evidence are provided in the Addendum Exhibits (AEs).

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE6) GPA Data].

[See also Addendum Exhibit (AE33) Transfer Data].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE67) Diversity of Candidates (Admission to Completion)].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE71) TSI for Admissions Data].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE72) ACT and SAT Data for Admissions].

[See Addendum Exhibit (AE85) Educator Preparation Program Handbook (2016-2017). Draft Presentation